What’s On

Aug
20
Tue
Golden Threads of Life @ Nature in Art
Aug 20 @ 10:00 am – Sep 8 @ 5:00 pm

Rarely seen, yet glittering to behold, this is a display of gold, silver and metal thread embroidery to dazzle and delight, embracing nature in all its forms. All the pieces are made by members of the Goldwork Guild, at least one of whom will be demonstrating this ancient craft daily within the exhibition. The Goldwork Guild was formed in 2004 by Janice Williams to keep the art alive in the 21st century.
Modern goldwork will be displayed together with a few antique pieces reflecting the fact that this work dates back over 2000 years when only royals, nobility and those of great wealth could afford such magnificence in garments, robes, domestic furnishings and religious embellishments. Whilst the history of metal thread embroidery goes back so far in history that its origins are lost, it’s widely believed that goldwork embroidery originated in China. From there the art form spread to Asia, Persia, India, Japan, the Middle East, and the ancient civilisations of Assyria and Babylonia. Over time and up to the present day it further spread to North Africa, Spain, Italy, Western Europe, Great Britain, Scandinavia, North America, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Goldwork is also mentioned in the Bible within the book of Exodus, where it states ‘He made the ephod of gold, blue, purple, scarlet and fine twined linen. They did beat the gold into thin plates, and cut it into wires, to work it in the blue, and in the purple and scarlet, and in the fine linen with cunning work.’ The very earliest examples employed pure gold and silver. The metals were flattened and wound around strands of animal and human hair. However, the gold and silver were both very brittle. Later the metals were wound around silk, paper, animal gut and parchment, and originally this process was done by hand which required great patience and skill, and the cost of such threads was extremely high.
Present day goldwork and metal thread embroidery is more affordable now as there are now substitutes, even though real gold and silver is of course still used (and comes from Japan.)
Throughout history, goldwork has been worked into fabric decoration and can be used not only in other embroidery, but applique with variegated shimmering patterns made luxurious using gold, silver, metallic threads and precious stones.
Ceremonial, military and religious attire is still adorned with the richness of gold embroidery. However, the design for military pieces is necessarily constrained by tradition as one would expect, but the goldwork that embellishes domestic, religious and ceremonial attire is still being worked today by many embroiderers. Other techniques and materials can be worked to create contemporary pieces reflecting the 21st century.
This particular art form is prized for the way the light plays upon it, which is influenced not just by the richness of the metal thread used, but also by the variety of metal threads available and the techniques used.

 

Sep
3
Tue
Stitched on the Wildside
Sep 3 @ 10:00 am – Sep 22 @ 5:00 pm

   

WyeSevern Textile Artists from Mid Wales are inspired by the natural world. Each member has their own dynamic way of interpreting the subject. A diverse range of styles and mixed media techniques are used resulting in a varied and inspiring display.
Drawing underpins all of Mari Harpham’s artwork; a way to discover, reflect and interpret. Each image comprises numerous spontaneous sketches exploring movement and behaviour linked to the environment. The intimate journey of each drawing from nature is then developed into a linocut for printing, into stitch, or on to paper.
After many years of making block quilts, where wrinkles and folds were regarded as imperfections, Angela Morris now introduces texture and structure into her work. She is increasingly influenced by natural phenomena such as the Aurora Borealis, and high level photo imagery where colour and pattern are inspirational.
Bronwen Jenkins turned to textiles after a career teaching biology. Her lifelong interest in natural history strongly influences her current work. This is mainly machine embroidery with an emphasis on landscape and wild plants, including lichens and mosses
Pat Gibson is primarily a lacemaker specialising in needlelace. Historical lace pieces are influental, much of their design coming from nature. Experimentation by Pat has led to incorporating the technique into mixed media work.
With a background in graphic design and watercolour painting Pamela Higgs works with hand dyed fabric, creating a layered effect with painted or stencilled papers. Free machine embroidery and hand embezzling with beads and found objects unifies the pieces.
Inspired by landscapes and the countryside around her home, Ann Breese creates her designs using hand and machine embroidery on a variety of backgrounds. Her recent work has been inspired by wild flowers growing in fields and on country lanes in spring and early summer.
This Atrium exhibition is one of a series highlighting the work of local and regional arts, crafts and photography groups. Don’t miss it!

Meet a member of the group on Sept 3rd, 7th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 20th, 21st and 22nd.

Sep
7
Sat
Exploring Drawing – Nik Pollard @ Nature in Art
Sep 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Drawing is a fantastic way of exploring the world around us.

This one day workshop is designed to be fun it will invigorate, excite and challenge.  The morning session will be a series of short exercises exploring drawing. Participants will develop ways of seeing, interpreting and making. The afternoon session will be made up of longer exercises where participants will be able to develop their drawing skills further with the aid of one to one tuition.

This workshop is open to all who want to draw!

Sep
10
Tue
As the Crow Flies
Sep 10 @ 10:00 am – Oct 6 @ 5:00 pm

Art Inspired by the landscape, flora and fauna in and around a working quarry by Esther Tyson

Esther Tyson SWLA is at the forefront of contemporary wildlife art and a council member of the Society of Wildlife Artists She studied at the University of Wales before being accepted into the Royal College of Art, London where she won a travel scholarship to study large carnivores in Slovakia. That trip ignited a passion for travel, drawing, painting and observing creatures in their natural environment.
After graduating from the Royal College of Art in 2003, living and working in the wilds of South Wales, Esther secured a 3 month placement on Aride Island in the Seychelles, working alongside biologists in the field, observing the behaviour of many bird species including the Seychelles Magpie Robin, a thrush size bird threatened with extinction and in 2005 cited on the red data list. This was an important time of learning and understanding.
Surrounded by the Indian Ocean and contemplating a fear of deep water, Esther decided to apply for a scuba diving bursary through the SWLA and Dorset Wildlife Trust. Incredibly, Esther won the award and a few weeks later became an open water scuba diver. A different world entirely, drawing underwater, the COLD waters off the Dorset coast and later, the warmer waters off Song Saa Private Island, Cambodia.
Esther has been involved in projects within the UK and Worldwide, working alongside organisations such as Birdlife International (Nepal, Vultures), BTO (Senegal/Norfolk, Migration), DKM (Turkey), Esther Benjamin Trust (Nepal), Free the Bears (Phnom Penh), FFI (Cambodia), Salford Council (Salford), Royal Parks (London), SWLA, and the Natural History Museum (the Big Draw).
Esther currently lives and works in the South Peak District where she combines a studio and observational outdoor practice. ‘As the Crow Flies’ is a selection of work, created especially for this exhibition, that focuses on an area close to her home – a working quarry. Finding inspiration, life and beauty in a what many might consider an unlikely location, Esther gives us an insight into this project …
‘My high place, a place of solitude, of thought, of peace and of beauty? Really? Are quarries not a blight on the landscape…
Life brims in the boundary lines and spills over into farmland and limestone cliffs alike. So far, Jackdaws finding cracks and holes, Ravens a step in an old crevice and the falcons on a ledge high above the busy workings of this quarry. Wild flowers take over the slopes, wagtails and redstarts return and I’m still hoping to see wheatear…
My interest in the Raven has continued since tracking wolves in Slovakia back in 2003 and having found the quarries’ resident pair, I have spent time observing their behaviour in and around the nest site. It feels decadent drawing these birds and a huge privilege painting the adults as they prepare to sit… Pied wagtails arrive and forage close to where I sit, wood pigeons feed in the trees that edge the quarry face, a blast and the pigeon in turn feeds a Peregrine…
I’ve watched this pair of falcons for 8 years and now I have the luxury of including them in my work. With the ravens sitting, time is freed to find the possible nest site of the Peregrine. I had an inkling early on and at quite a distance have watched the female prepare the nest site, the pair chase another male from their territory, a buzzard forced to ground and our resident falcons mate. The female begins her sit which in turn, is perfect timing to pick up on the ravens once again. 40 days back and fore feeding young, 5 youngsters fledged and the subsequent days exploring are charming!
Now I return to wild flowers and peregrine falcons …’
This exhibition features a broad range of works both large and small, nearly all produced in the field. Many will be for sale. Do come and meet Esther September 10th – 15th when she will be artist in residence.

Sep
14
Sat
How to Draw an Owl in Graphite Pencil – Jamie Boots @ Nature in Art
Sep 14 @ 10:00 am – Sep 15 @ 5:00 pm

On this 2-day course you will learn all about working with graphite pencil from experienced artist Jamie Boots.

Graphite pencil can be used to produce so much more than just a sketch.

Jamie will show participants that. whether or not you are using a pencil that is blunt or sharp, pressing lightly or hard, or using a variety of tones, the realistic texture of skin, fur and the glassy look of an eye can be achieved.

Example of work by Jamie Boots

Sep
18
Wed
Drawing in Ink – Ian Coleman @ Nature in Art
Sep 18 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

With a natural history theme this is an introduction to various ink drawing tools and surfaces, with a focus on penning and brushing techniques. A look at creating high contrasts, shading, tones and line styles with small examples in sketchbooks and various papers. Get ready for Inktober 2019 on Instagram, a world wide motivational challenge to encourage you to get inky, to be inspired and improve your drawing skills and share your results.

Sep
20
Fri
Glass Fusing – Sharon Foley @ Nature in Art
Sep 20 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Glass fusing is joining two or more layers of glass through heating in a kiln.

There are several techniques that can be adapted to this basic principle some of which give surprising results. This 1-day course will teach some of those techniques alongside glass cutting (if you are new or in need of a refresher) and consist of glass layering, use of glass frits, powders and encapsulation between layers of glass.

The course will guide you in designing and making either 4 glass coasters or a larger, flat piece of art glass. These will then be fired in a kiln and ready for collection after the course.

Sep
21
Sat
Wolf Portrait, Coloursoft Pencils on Mountboard – Karen Coulson @ Nature in Art
Sep 21 @ 10:00 am – Sep 22 @ 5:00 pm

This course is a wonderful introduction to the world of coloured pencil techniques. Learn the art of layering and blending Derwent Coloursoft Pencils whilst using different pencil strokes to create the textures required for the  subject. All materials will be supplied including a line drawing to trace for those not wishing to draw free hand.

Example of work by Karen Coulson

 

Sep
25
Wed
Norman Thelwell: An Illustrated Talk by Tim Craven @ Nature in Art
Sep 25 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Norman Thelwell: Celebrated cartoonist and artist

An illustrated talk by Tim Craven

Tim Craven is an artist, former Curator at Southampton City Art Gallery and well known to Nature in Art. This talk traces the life, passions and artistic development of  Norman Thelwell from his early years and formative wartime experiences to his subsequent rise to become one of the nation’s best known and loved cartoonists of his era. His works were full of beautifully observed detail and mainly of rural subjects,  including country and leisure pursuits, sport, house sales and renovation, stately homes, gardening and sailing. Thelwell also was an early and passionate campaigner for the environment and a master of watercolour landscapes. A fascinating evening for all.

£8 including finger buffet

Doors open 7pm to view galleries. 7.30pm buffet. 8.10pm talk

TICKETS MUST BE BOOKED IN ADVANCE PLEASE

Wallsworth Evenings are held every month.

Oct
8
Tue
Nature’s Code @ Nature in Art
Oct 8 @ 10:00 am – Oct 20 @ 5:00 pm

Since January we have been delighted to have had Bella Lucchesi join us for a day a week as Nature in Art’s Curatorial Trainee. Bella is from the USA and is undertaking an MA in Curating at UWE, Bristol. As part of her course she has been working closely with Collections Officer Emily Cooper to assemble this display. It is based on the Fibonacci Sequence and the Golden Ratio; how it appears in nature, and in works of art (whether that be by chance or design) and exploring its suggested relationship to beauty. It follows on well from David Trapnell’s talk earlier in the year ‘Is Beauty in the eye of the beholder?’. Here Bella introduces the selection of works …

The Fibonacci sequence is a series of numbers, starting from 0 where every number is the sum of the two numbers preceding it. The Golden Ratio is a number that’s equal to approximately 1.618. This number, often known as “phi” from the Greek alphabet, is in fact not equal to precisely 1.618 because it is an irrational number – meaning that its decimal digits carry on forever without repeating a pattern.

Although these are separate terms, coincidentally they closely relate to each other in many ways. If one takes any two successive   Fibonacci numbers, their ratio is very close to the Golden ratio. As the numbers get higher, the ratio becomes even closer to 1.618. For example, the ratio of 3 to 5 is 1.666. But the ratio of 13 to 21 is 1.625.  Getting even higher, the ratio of 144 to 233 is 1.618. These numbers are all successive numbers in the Fibonacci sequence. These numbers can also be applied to the proportions of a rectangle, called the Golden rectangle. This is thought as one of the most visually satisfying geometric forms and has been applied in numerous creative disciplines for centuries.

These concepts appear frequently in art compositions as well as in nature, whether that is in the florets of a sunflower, pine cone seeds or sea shells. This exhibition will investigate these terms in relation to nature and art and hopefully act as a starting point for visitors own explorations into art and nature. Most of the paintings, prints and 3D items have been selected from our collection but there are also a number of items on loan from artists and Gallery Pangolin, to whom we express our thanks.

Even if the Fibonacci numbers and Golden Ratio seem daunting to you, there’s much to inspire and set the mind thinking in this selection. Come and see!