The Wonder of the World

When:
15th October 2019 @ 10:00 am – 17th November 2019 @ 5:00 pm
2019-10-15T10:00:00+01:00
2019-11-17T17:00:00+00:00

This is a special exhibition of ceramic sculpture by internationally renowned sculptor Linda Heaton-Harris.  This is an opportunity to see a wide selection of her work, much of it fresh from the kiln. Plus visitors can see her in the studio November 12th – 17th.

The title of the exhibition, chosen by Linda, is taken from one of her favourite quotes. It is thought to have originally been found on an old gravestone many years ago. The wildlife author and artist D.J. Watkins-Pitchford (known as BB) used it as a quote on the frontice piece of many of his books. It reads …

The wonder of the world, the beauty and

The power, the shapes of things, their colours,

Lights, and shades; these I saw.

Look ye also while life lasts

Linda recently moved to Cornwall to a smallholding/farm on the edge of Bodmin Moor overlooking Rough Tor. It is ‘a fantastic area full of ancient history including, stone huts and standing stone circles and of course wonderful wildlife’. The location is also near the North Cornish coast, Port Isaac, Rock and Padstow, yet again offering wonderful scenery, walks and wildlife. Her purpose built studio has magnificent views of the craggy granite rocks of Rough Tor and the Moor with it’s fascinating ever changing scenery. It is here that she created the works in this unique selection.

Linda originally trained as a teacher studying English Literature and History, becoming interested in ceramics while still at college.  At first her work centred on abstract flower and plant forms, often vibrantly coloured, but she soon started to follow her real passion, and began sculpting animals and birds.

Linda’s work falls into two main categories: hand built, individual pieces demonstrating a more simplified approach, and extremely detailed individual bird and animal sculptures, both life size and miniatures. With both styles she endeavours to capture the essence of the animal or bird.

A variety of techniques and clays are used to produce a range of textures with various oxides, slips and stains applied to retain the fine detail. The pieces are fired at least twice. The detailed intricate bird studies involve many hours work, being built up ‘feather by feather’. Thus a single sculpture can involve several hundred feathers alone and can take several weeks to complete. Some of the pieces have flowers or foliage, these are also built up one petal, leaf or stamen at a time.  Amongst the items created especially for this exhibition are a miniature piece of a pod of hippos and a Juvenile Cuckoo being fed. Others are in the kiln as we write, always a nerve-wracking time as accidents can occur. Linda’s pieces need several firings which adds to the trepidation!

 

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